jessicaoakes

Framing The World Through My Photographs

Lighting Diagrams

As this term I will be using the studio a fair amount , it is a good idea to have a plan of how I would want the lights to be set up, before I get into the studio, as this will save a lot of time when i’m in the studio as usually you only have a set amount of time.

In college I got introduced to a website specifically for creating lighting diagrams. ( http://www.lightingdiagrams.com/Creator).

The site includes a panel of lots of little symbols which represent different types of lights, backgrounds,etc. Which you drag onto the grid depending on what you are planning to use. The icons and be to dragged to be re arranged.

Screen Shot 2013-04-15 at 20.20.24

This is a quick example of a lighting diagram for backlighting.

lighting-diagram-1366706880

Export the diagram from the website as a PNG. Then open it in Photoshop. Using the text tool write the camera settings in a box near the camera, then near each of the lights write the names of the lights as media loan shop names them and what setting they were on. It is also ago to add in the distances, as the distance a light or where the model can be makes a big difference to the photo.

For future references keep a note of all the lighting diagrams along with a photo of the photo it creates. This means you will be able to go back to the diagrams ad be able to re create the photo.

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This entry was posted on April 23, 2013 by in Working With Light.
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